Posts Tagged ‘pain’

Will I try adding ginger to my diet? Maybe, but more likely I will do more research before I do.

Amplify’d from www.webmd.com

Sept. 20, 2010 — Ginger’s soothing properties may not be limited to the stomach. A new study shows that ginger may also be an effective pain reliever for sore muscles.

Ginger has been a favorite remedy of Chinese medicine for centuries and is often used to treat nausea and upset stomach. However, researchers say, it hasn’t been widely studied as a pain reliever until now.

The study, published in The Journal of Pain, showed a daily dose of ginger eased muscle pain caused by exercise-induced muscle injury. In two separate experiments, researchers looked at the effects of two grams of raw or heat-treated ginger in supplement form on muscle pain caused by exercise in 74 healthy adults. The participants performed a variety of exercises designed to induce muscle pain over a period of 11 days while taking ginger supplements or a dummy pill.

The results showed that raw and heat-treated ginger reduced muscle pain by 25% and 23%, respectively.

Researchers say previous studies in animals have shown that ginger has anti-inflammatory properties, which might help explain its beneficial effects on muscle pain.

Although some studies have suggested that heat treatment may enhance ginger’s impact on pain, researchers say their findings show heat treatment had little effect on ginger’s effectiveness as a pain reliever.

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Well, while this is not an alternative for me to use, I do know cancer survivors who have used marijuana to help with nausea and pain while dealing with treatment as well as those who have lost limbs in accidents and they swear by the assistance of marijuana in the management of their pain.

I say to each his own and if it works, who am I to say otherwise?

Amplify’d from www.webmd.com

Aug. 30, 2010 — Three puffs a day of cannabis, better known as marijuana, helps people with chronic nerve pain due to injury or surgery feel less pain and sleep better, a Canadian team has found.

”It’s been known anecdotally,” says researcher Mark Ware, MD, assistant professor of anesthesia and family medicine at McGill University in Montreal. “About 10% to 15% of patients attending a chronic pain clinic use cannabis as part of their pain [control] strategy,” he tells WebMD.

cannabis sativa leaves

Ware evaluated 21 men and women, average age 45, who had chronic nerve pain (also called neuropathic pain). A typical example, Ware tells WebMD, is a patient who had knee surgery and during the course of the operation the surgeon may have had no choice but to cut a nerve, leading to chronic pain after the surgery.

”Each person was in the study for two months, and used all four strengths [including placebo],” Ware says. He rotated them through the four strengths in different orders, and they didn’t know which they were using.

The cannabis was put into gelatin capsules, then put into the bowl of a pipe. Each person was told to inhale for five seconds while the cannabis was lit, hold the smoke in their lungs for 10 seconds, and then exhale.

After each of the five-day trials, participants rated their pain on a scale of zero to 10, with 10 being the worst.

The highest dose, 9.4%, provided relief, Ware says. “They reduced their pain down to 5.4,” Ware says. “Those on placebo were at 6.1.”

The concentration of 9.4%, Ware says, is lower than that found in marijuana on the street. “On the street, it’s 10% to 15% THC, more or less,” he says.

“We’ve shown again that cannabis is analgesic,” Ware says. “Clearly, it has medical value.”

Side effects were reported, including headache, dry eyes, numbness, cough, and a burning sensation in the area with pain.

The cannabis relieves pain, Ware says, by ”changing the way the nerves function.”

He points out the average daily pain relief was lower, ”but not hugely so,” for people taking the highest concentration of marijuana.

Among McQuay’s disclosures are serving as an advisory board member for Pfizer’s Data Safety and Monitoring Board, as a consultant for Sanofi and other companies, and receiving royalties for a textbook on pain.

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