Sexting and Your Child

Posted: July 4, 2010 in family law
Tags: , , , , , , ,
Texting on a keyboard phone
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I read a great article on MomLogic today and thought I would pass some of the information on to you parents about Sexting.  In case you don’t know what sexting is, it involves people, mostly teens, taking nude pictures of themselves and sending to their friends via their phone or PDA.  There can be some serious consequences for sexting, which you can read more about in the article.  The article written by Eric Fisher, Ph.D., states:

The Buck Stops with You!
“I do hold society’s attitudes, the media and the Internet partly responsible for the sexting thing, but parents as a whole need to take the time to both talk to their kids and listen to them, and be in a place to guide and teach. It’s vital to get the heartbeat of your children’s attitudes and emotions, so you can help them understand where their power, self-respect, honor and dignity really come from (i.e., inside themselves). You are their most important role model. In some ways, it makes me wonder: Is sexting just a variation of the streaking and “free love” of the ’70s? Are we all just looking outside of ourselves to find identity, worth and value?

That said, what can you do to decrease the chances of your child engaging in this dangerous activity? Here are a few ideas:

1) Be proactive. Plan years ahead, and keep communication open. If you encourage and foster nonjudgmental, reflective communication when your kids are young, it will encourage them to develop these qualities as they grow.
2) Be honest with your appraisal of your kids. Many parents live in denial of their kids’ behaviors until it is too late, because they either don’t want to think they’ve failed as parents or don’t want to see their kids as having problems.
3) Talk to your kids about these types of activities and ask them their feelings about it. Ask them if they know any peers who may have engaged in sexting, and how they view them. If they don’t want to give names, respect that.
4) If your child has had a tendency to hide behaviors from you, request random searches of his or her phone and computer data. While they may have an issue with this, if they have nothing to hide, they should understand that you are doing it to protect them and you.
5) Understand that while your child may be in denial, sexting is a behavior that communicates deeper issues and a lack of confidence and self-respect. Arrogance IS a protective emotion. Be careful not to shame or humiliate them. Help them to realize the dangers and deeper issues.
6) Be willing to get help from a professional. Many times, you are too close to your kids to help them look at these issues and resolve them.”

As parents, you are responsible for what your children are doing, even when on their cell phone.  Things have certainly changed since my children were teenagers, and now that I have teenage grandchildren, it can be pretty darn scary to think about all that goes on!

Read more: http://www.momlogic.com/2010/07/sexting_101_what_you_need_to_know_as_a_parent.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Momlogic+%28MomLogic%29#ixzz0sj9fNUQf

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